These 7 Places in China Will Blow You Away
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These 7 Places in China Will Blow You Away

Not only is China one of the oldest civilizations in the world, it’s also one of the most beautiful places on earth. There are 48 World Heritage Sites in China, with the Great Wall as the first one to be listed by UNESCO.

From natural wonders to extraordinary architecture, China has so much to offer, and visiting the massive country once just isn’t going to be enough. Here are some of China’s top attractions that will keep you coming back for the first time, the second, and many more to come!

Abandoned Village at Shengshan Island

Abandoned Village at Shengshan Island
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It’s amazing how a small, abandoned fishing village in China has transformed into a green wonderland after it was swallowed by mother nature. The seaside ghost town was abandoned by local fishermen who once lived there. After learning that it was more economical for them to work in mainland China, they all fled.

The entire village is now covered with vines that sprawl across the village, giving it an eerie jungle look with frightfully creepy vibes. Mother nature surely knows how to take back what was once hers, hence creating an amazing natural artwork in the process.

Hani Rice Terraces

Hani Rice Terraces
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Cultivated for more than 1,000 years by the Hani people (who came to the terrain 2,500 years ago), the Hani Rice Terraces of Yuanyang on the Ailo Mountain’s southern slopes provide a stunning view, especially for nature lovers. They are one of the most beautiful and complex rice terraces in the world.

Also known as ‘land sculpture,’ the Hani Rice Terraces are recognized as a World Cultural and Natural Heritage Site by UNESCO in 2013. The beautiful rice terraces were incorporated into 82 villages and a farming system that included aquaculture and cattle-breeding. Although they’re no longer seen as a fertile zone for the local farmers, the barren land is popularly visited by travelers who throng to see them at their finest, between December and March.

Palace Museum

Palace Museum, China
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Located in Beijing, the Palace Museum, or also known as the Forbidden City, is another of China’s most popular travel destination. Among local Chinese, it’s known as Gù Gōng, which means ancient palace. Built in the 15th century, the building was once home to 24 emperors during the Ming and Qing dynasties. Its construction took 14 years to complete!.

Today, it’s the largest and best-preserved ancient building in China, and is in fact the biggest palace in the world. Therefore, it’s not surprising that the Palace Museum has been listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site since 1987. Visitors can visit it any day in July and August every year.

Yangtze River

Yangtze River, China
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Visit China’s longest river, the Yangtze river, which is also the third longest river in the world. The scenic river is a living source for many and its breathtaking views are a representation of its diverse cultures.

The Yangtze gorges are the river’s highlights. One of them is the Tiger Leaping Gorge, which is the deepest gorge in the world with towering mountains standing at 4,000 meters above sea level. Then there are the Three Gorges, which are popular  spots for those who wish to experience a relaxing cruise experience.

Terracotta Army

Terracotta Army, China
Source: Hung Chung Chih / Shutterstock.com

Located in Xi’an, this site, which was found in three vaults, is one of the world’s most famous archaeological finds that features 8,000 lifelike terracotta warriors with about 130 chariots. They’ve been guarding over the souls of the country’s first unifier for over 2 millennia.

There aren’t many weapons left there as most of them have been stolen. The faces of the soldiers are also not as good as how they were in the past. Even the coloring has faded out. These historical monuments may have lost their original beauty, but they’re a good representation of a group of hardworking, skillful, and dedicated Chinese laborers.

The Great Wall of China

The Great Wall of China
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No article about China is complete without talking about The Great Wall of China. It’s the country’s first cultural icon, which was recognized by UNESCO in 1987. Its construction started from 770 – 476 BC and lasted until the Ming Dynasty, which took place from 1368 to 1644. The massive bridge that undulates over the peaks of Beijing was initially used to defend China from barbarian nomads’ attacks.

Every year, millions of worldwide travelers visit Beijing to be dazzled by the Great Wall of China and its amazing structure, which is truly one of the greatest Chinese monuments ever found today. Get ready to experience an extraordinary stroll at one of the new seven wonders of the world!

Leshan Giant Buddha

Leshan Giant Buddha, China
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Standing tall at 71 meters on the hillside of Xijuo Peak, the Leshan Great Buddha whose fingers are 3 meters long is one of China’s most popular travel sites today. Built during the Tang Dynasty in the 8th century, the scenic attraction is also the world’s biggest Buddha statue that’s often featured in poems, songs, and stories.

Being the world’s tallest pre-modern statue, the Leshan Great Buddha overlooks three rivers in the southern part of Sichuan province: Minjiang, Dadu, and Qingyi. On the other hand, a beautiful mountain called Mount Emei stands confidently at the massive sculpture. Together, both of these scenic sites are recognized as UNESCO World Heritage Sites since 1996.

Which of these attractions have caught your attention? If you find them tempting, don’t wait any longer. Book your flight ticket to China now and explore!

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